22Gz “Sniper Gang Freestyle”

I hadn’t heard of 22Gz until I was perusing WSHH and his video came up. This was 6 days ago and since then this track has been on steady repeat on my YouTube Red and Spotify.

I am not usually into “diss songs” but 22Gz is a straight savage in this track which serves as a diss to a variety of rappers that include, Tory Lanez, G Herbo, D Savage, and 6ix9ine.

And the craziest lyric of them all is something that I find a little risky for a rapper to be saying at this moment and time, towards the end 22Gz says, “Killin nxggas & I rap about it, like I’m Melly Nxgga”. I don’t know man, with the rising amount of florida rappers being investigated and charged for crimes, simply because of rap lyrics… I wouldn’t be so brazen but hey thats what makes 22Gz stand out, and thats what makes rap…RAP.

Sixteenleo is “No Pretenda”

I’ve been out for awhile, starting the next phase of Curated Flame.

In that time, I have been contacted by dozens of wanna be rappers, sending me various dms or emails and unfortunately, I just haven’t been impressed. That is, until now.

Sixteenleo, might not have the best name, and he’s still very raw and early, I mean he literally only has 19 followers on Soundcloud right now. But he impressed me enough that I am writing for the first time in a couple months.

When I first got his email and saw that he said I have “heavy anxiety and that’s why I been in my room making music for the last two years” I rolled my eyes, I am not even going to lie though. I’ve heard this before, from this generation of rappers whose top 5’s all have at least 4 “Lil’s”.

Then when I started listening to his first track, I liked it, but I was kind of annoyed that I liked it. I’m thinking to myself, this kid’s just doing it as a joke, but you know what, fxck it. I think it might not be a joke, he’s really committed to the craft, he switches up his flows, and his awkward flows are even dope.

If his tracks, Rick James and No Pretenda, are any inkling of what his music is going to be like in the future, then I think this dude is going places. His style sounds like a blend of Lil Pump & Hooligan Chase and I fux with it heavy.

GlokkNine’s “Leonardo Da G9” video & his new mixtape

GlokkNine has been an artist I have been listening to for a hot minute now and I have been watching his career grow and grow and grow. So imagine my surprise when I see he has released a new music video and this is the first one that I know of, that is not directed by Drewfilmedit.

Why does this matter?

In the grand scheme of things, it doesnt. But I have just become so use to hearing “if drew didn’t film it, then it aint filmed right” at the beginning of every glokknine video.

GlokkNine needs to get back to working with that kid cause drews tagline is almost as good as metro boomin’s or halfpint filmz.

In the meantime, you should check out his newest tape Lil Glokk That Stole Khristmas and you absolutely musttttt listen to his track “Xmas Song” which I pray he does a video for!

Tulsa, Oklahoma, will pay you $10k to move there for 1 year

This is for my producers, graphic designers, writers, and more. People that are making a living from the music business among various ways, but for the most part, you are “working from home”.

You see, Tulsa, Oklahoma is paying people 10k to move there for one year. They want people who work remotely, i.e. at home. Which for a lot of us, is right up our wheelhouse! I am just throwing out an idea but what if we, and by we I mean all of us writers, producers, engineers, graphic designers, n videographers. What if we all apply to this and use it to fund the next great hip hop/rap community🤔🤔

Just a thought, either way, this could be a great opportunity for many of us. So I encourage you to apply, the application is pretty painless and can be found at tulsaremote.com

When you apply and they ask you where you heard about this, plz tell them Curated Flame.

Reviews and why they should matter to you as a beatmaker

For the producers, rappers, and music entrepreneurs who read this site, you will know that I often pursue business interests in other areas besides Hip Hop/Rap but I always come back with something interesting to share that I think can translate to the music business.  So today I want to talk about reviews!

A little background:

In late September I created an Etsy shop where I sell several kinds of rolling papers.

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Etsy has a great marketplace and its customers are willing to take a risk on new shop BUT just like with any other shop or online market place, you want to have reviews. People are just more willing to shop with you if they see 50+ reviews compared to 3.

Now I read and have heard different ratios that say on average for etsy, you will get 1 review for every 10 or 25 customers you have. So if someone had 320 sales (249 completed orders), like I do, they should expect to have about 10 to 25 reviews but notice above that my shop actually has 65! That is a ratio of  not only just 1 review, but one 5 star review for every 4 customers on average! To put this in perspective, another shop in the same category as me, has 1144 sales but only 46 reviews.

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Why do I have a great ratio for reviews?

Every day or two, I go and I check what orders have been delivered. I then send a message to the customer saying something like the following;

“1. I want to make sure they got to you safely and undamaged.

2. Are you enjoying them?:)

3. Is there any chance you could leave a review on Etsy?

4. Here is a discount code for your next purchase.”

That’s the special trick, reaching out to the customers.

How does this translate to me? a music entrepreneur, rapper, or producer?

For a beatmaker, graphic designer, etc. I would recommend reaching out to all of your previous customers, no matter how long its been since they purchased something from you, be it a design or beat, etc.  Its about to be December, if you have been selling for a little bit you should have data of your customers.

Reach out to these customers and email / dm them a message that goes a little something like;

“Hey (rappers name);

I am messaging you because;

  1. Hows everything been since you purchased (instrumental name)?
  2. If possible, would you leave a review or comment on (your site, beatstars, instagram, etc)
  3. Is there anything I can do to for you?
  4. Here’s a discount code for your next purchase”

That is it everyone, seriously.

I know a lot of people in this game focus a lot on getting customers but then never do, what I would call, customer maintenance. I mean, ok, say you sold 250 beats this year, great! But how many of those were repeat customers?

 

 

 

 

 

Is Riff Raff timeless?

I mean seriously. This track “Dukez of Hazard” is a banger and I think that if it doesn’t get to big the only reason might be is because its Riff Raff. I know that’s a weird dichotomy, like the video is going to definitely get hundreds of thousands if not a couple million views at least, but at the same time there’s a limited cap most likely of how big it could get. That’s just what happens for the most part when you get to the point of being a veteran in the rap game and truth be told at this point, Riff Raff is a veteran, and to a lot of people, a legend.

The first minute and a half of “Dukes of Hazard” is a weirdly deep voice that is not what you normally expect from Riff but its surprisingly good. Later on, in the song, he switches his flow back up to his classic Riff Raff voice and the song maintains.

I don’t know, I feel like if Riff starts to put out more bangers like this then homie might just have a renaissance.

Riff Raff’s real first name is Horace, and I love that.

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Is “Dat Way” the song that breaks Elle Teresa to the American market?

I think this is the song that’s going to get Elle Teresa’s name out further in the states. This song bangs and sounds like the perfect blend of Japanese & American Sugar Trap…

Drake’s music earns over $120K in streaming royalties a day.

Recently I have been doing a lot of research into streaming and the royalties/earnings it can generate for musicians. One of the reasons being is because I myself own the rights to a buzzing hit on the underground / internet hip hop scene. Using distrokid I have gained first hand access to information such as what the two major giants are currently paying per stream, on average Spotify is paying $.0030734967 per stream and Apple Music is paying $.0068986784 per stream.

Knowing this information and doing the math at how many streams it would take for the song I own to make me serious money I started wondering what artists like Drake are making from streaming. I know I am not the only one wondering this so that is why I made this article!

Key Drake streaming stats:

What are these stats worth? 

All the different streaming sites have different royalty rates that have changed over the years and for the most part they have gone down instead of up. At the same time streaming rates have been going down, in contrast, Drake’s popularity has been increasing, so I believe using the current rates I have been seeing on my distrokid account will be a fair average for Spotify ($.00307) and Apple ($.0068). For the other streaming sites that account for the other 27 Billion streams that Drake’s music has generated, I will use the rough average of .005 that other music analysts use.  Now that we have the rates lets answer how much money has Drake’s music been generating?

Apple Music

  • Drake has at least 10 Billion streams on Apple Music; which would generate $68.986784 million in earnings.
  • I was curious how much this meant Apple Music was paying out to Drake and his various labels a day. So I looked it up and found that the Apple Music app was officially released June 30, 2015 and they announced that Drake had been the first artist on their platform to hit 10 billion streams on July 19th, 2018.  That means it took Drake 1115 days, to hit 10 billion plays! $68.98674 million divided by 1115 days equals on average, earnings of $61, 871.51 a day!

Spotify

  • Drake’s 13 Billion streams on Spotify,  using the current rate of $.0030734967 per stream, should have generated at least $39.9554571 million.
  • Drakes first album was released June 15th, 2010 and the article stating he had at least 13 billion plays came out August 8, 2018. Thats 2,976 days to accumulate 13 billion plays / $39.9 million, which basically means Spotify is paying the Drake empire roughly $13, 425.89 a day.

Other streaming sites:

  • The article I read about Drake being the first artist to accumulate 50 billion streams was published on August 8, 2018. As the article states, 27 billion of these streams came from other sites besides Spotify and Apple Music. Well there are over 100 streaming sites and they all have different royalty rates but an industry average when doing calculations like this for earnings, is $.005. Which means those 27 billion plays should have generated roughly $135 million!!!
  • Using the same length of time that we did for Spotify, which was 2976 days since Drake dropped Thank Me Later. That’s $135 million divided by 2976 which equals out to $45, 362.90 a day!

TLDR; 

  • Drakes music generates around $120, 660.3 A DAY!  That’s over $5,000 an hour!
  • Drakes music has generated roughly $243.9 million in total streaming royalties from June 15, 2010 to August 8, 2018. I was curious so I looked it up and saw that it has been 69 days since the publishing/release of the announcement that he hit 50 billion plays. So I took the average amount his music is earning a day ($120,660.3) and multiplied it by 69 which equals out to $8,325,560.7. This means Drake’s music has generated over $250 million in total streaming earnings!

Finally:

I know a bunch of people are going to read this and be like “damn, Drake made a quarter billion off streaming! He’s making over $100k a day from streaming!” But no that really isn’t the case. That $250 million is being split up a whole bunch of ways;

  1. Universal Republic gets a 25% distribution fee.
  2. Aspire Music Group, Young Money, and Cash Money records all get a piece.
  3. Drake.
  4. Songwriters.
  5. Producers.
  6. Featured artists

Thats up to 8 different ways (including all labels) that the money is being split BEFORE taxes but at the end of the Drake is still making a huge amount of money from streaming daily. In general the point of this whole article is to show producers and rappers the power of streaming. Yes, you most likely won’t ever hit 50 billion streams but I know of plenty of quote on quote nobodies who have millions and/or tens of millions of streams and the whole point I am trying to make is that it stacks up.

Sidenote: I read an article recently about how Sting makes $2,000 a day from the song “I’ll be missing you” over 30 years after its release. Can you imagine how much “Drake” will be pulling in 30 years from now?