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Pierre Bourne made over $500k from the Gummo beat

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So a lot of controversy has swirled around 6ix9ine for many reasons, but the one that has most intrigued me. Has been about his song “Gummo” and depending on who you hear it from, one of two things happened. Either he was given or he stole the beat for Gummo from Trippie Redd, and that beat was made by Pierre Bourne.

So 6ix9ine releases Gummo, it  pops off, and a couple things have happened since its release:

  • Gummo goes gold in January, moving at least 500,000 units.
  • It’s leaked that Trippie Redd gets 10% of everything Tekashi69 releases because he helped him get his record deal and that’s how the deal worked out. Which by the way, I don’t see anything particularly wrong with, that isn’t that uncommon of a deal. He did help him get his deal.
  • His debut mixtape/album, Day 69, sells 55k first week.
  • Pierre Bourne, negotiated a deal where he gets 75% of the royalties of Gummo.

So looking at the information above, we know that means that the royalty split every time the Gummo video is viewed or the song is streamed or sold, breaks down like this:

  • Pierre Bourne – 75% / 6ix9ine – 15% / Trippie Redd – 10%

Well the songs been a hit, so how much are they making from it?

If you want the short answer it’s;

Total estimated minimum earnings for Gummo: $668,568

Total revenue for each artist: 

  • Pierre Bourne (75%) $501, 426
  • 6ix9ine [& label] (15%) $100,285.2
  • Trippie Redd (10%) $66,856.8

How did I come to this conclusion?

First, please note there are a lot of figures that come into play here and I do link to where I get my information as much as possible but some information I just know from experience and it can easily be googled if you want to double check.

Second, as a visible reference point, lets use the information released by Nipsey Hussle as a blueprint.

nip.png

Digital downloads

We know that Gummo was certified gold meaning at least 500K paid digital downloads in the U.S. at a rate of $1.29.

After the digital retailers get the 30% off the top, that leaves .903

500,000 x .903 = $451,500

Official music video

The official music video for Gummo, currently stands at 143, 277, 101 views on YouTube.

143, 277, 101 / 1,000,000 = 143.277101

So we take $690 and we multiply it by 143.277101 which gives us: $98, 861. 20

Other videos

I did a quick search and found that there are at least 10 more “videos” on YouTube that have the Gummo song or its instrumental in them and combined they have over 15 million views. Due to Pierre Bourne being so diligent I can only assume that his people, and therefore everyone else and their teams, are collecting the proper royalties from these videos as well. So…

15,000,000 / 1,000,000 = 15

15 x $690 = $10,350

First week sales

We know that he did “55,000 first week sales” but that breaks down to

  • 22K of those were in traditional album sales.
  • 33K of those were in album equivalents sales. It takes 1500 streams to get 1 album equivalent sale.

Tradional sales:

They don’t mean physical copies. The project was released on itunes, amazon, and other platforms with each song available for sale but also the full project. And the project is being sold for $5.99 on both amazon and itunes, which those companies get 30% of the price every time someone purchases.

So that means there is $4.19 for everyone involved on the 6ix9ine side after the retailers get there cut. There are 11 songs on the album meaning if you divide the $4.19 by those 11 songs, each song generated .38 cents per sale of the album.

$.3809 x 22K = $8,379.8

Mechanical Royalties: Every time the full album is purchased, or the single is purchased, mechanical royalties are generated for each song. The current mechanical royalty rate is 9.1 cents per song. This 9.1 cents is split between the songwriters / producers of each song on an album.

22K album sales x 9.1 cents = $2002

500K single sales x 9.1 = $45,500

Album equivalent sales (streams): 

That is where apple music, spotify, tidal, amazon music, soundcloud playlists, youtube (album playlists), come into play, the streaming services. It takes 1,500 streams to attain one album equivalent sale which means for the album to have attained 33K album equivalent sales, the songs where streamed 49,500,000 times in the first week!

But how much are streams generating… To be fair, and to make up for not having exact numbers on what soundcloud and some other smaller streaming services pay artists. I added the numbers from Tidal, Amazon, Itunes, and Spotify, that were shown in the nipsey hussle tweet and then divided them and found that the average pay is $.007 per stream.

Now that I have the average per stream pay but I need to know out of all those streams how many of those were for Gummo. Without access to exact numbers there is no way to know but honestly lets be real, that’s still his biggest hit to date. I mean Kooda (my favorite track of his) is still at 50 million views less than Gummo on Youtube. To be fair, I am going to say that from the first week album sales, at least 15% of the streams were from Gummo alone.

15% of 49,500,000 = 7,425,000 streams

7,425,000 streams x .007 = $51, 975

Total estimated minimum earnings for Gummo: $668,568

Total revenue for each artist: 

  • Pierre Bourne (75%) $501, 426
  • 6ix9ine [& label] (15%) $100,285.2
  • Trippie Redd (10%) $66,856.8

editors note:

This is just an estimate, but I stand strongly behind these numbers and tried to show and explain to you how I came to this conclusion. I actually would guess that there has been a couple hundred thousand more generated since we don’t have how many sales after it reached gold status, and the radio play numbers. But it’s cool to see that the producer of the track, in this instance, is bankrolling heavy and the rapper is banking less, when usually its the other way around.

The image for this article comes from a beat video by Rzee Beats.

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